Recovering Play – Mission Explore!

Mission Explore!

Outdoor Exploration

What is it and why is it important?

To quote Realising the Ambition p56 ‘Even the most uninspiring outdoor spaces can be transformed into a rich play environment creatively and inexpensively through the provision of loose parts play.  Instead of focusing on recreating indoor play areas outdoors, reflect upon the unique opportunities outdoor play affords for big movement and dynamic play. For instance, consider how fresh air, natural materials, and areas for digging, growing and splashing in puddles can contribute to a child’s learning and development in ways that could never be achieved indoors. Children flourish when playing outdoors in all weathers. Feeling sun, wind, rain, snow and ice first-hand is important as it connects us as human beings to the planet we live on. Being in nature stimulates the senses and nurtures a sense of wonder and awe at the processes of life. Outdoor environments can offer different surfaces, different levels, lots of natural features to explore, trees to climb, and bushes and shrubs to hide and build dens in’.

How to bring it back.

Ensure you provide, wherever possible, free flow between indoors and outdoors on a daily basis.  Think about how children access their outdoor wear, do they need to walk through the nursery or is it accessible? Consider having a snack station set up so children do not need to come inside just to have a snack. 

Sharing with home

Remind families that you will be outdoors daily and ask them to ensure their wee one is dressed appropriately for whatever type of weather there is. Explain to families why you go outdoors and the benefits of being there. Encourage them to spend time outdoors with their children too.

This is one of a weekly series of posts highlighting different spaces, experiences and interactions that practitioners have told us are not all easy to get back after the pandemic restrictions.

It’s all about playing, talking, and having fun together – so we hope they are useful.  If there are any ideas you’d like us to highlight, just get in touch with your link EYESO.

For ideas about family engagement, you will find a “home” version of this post on bumps2bairns.com

Recovering Play – Sharing Stories

Sharing Stories

What is it?

All of us love stories whether this is through reading books or simply retelling our experiences.  There are so many wonderful books to be enjoyed; we are not short of choice. Stories don’t just need to be for bedtime, they can be enjoyed at any time of the day. Finding a quiet, comfy spot helps with listening and concentration. Books can be fiction stories, factual information books and rhymes and poems too. Even chatting about your day  can be a story in itself.

Why is it important?

Children benefit from exploring the world using stories as it stimulates their imagination. They have the opportunity to hear new words, find out about other ways of doing things and learn how characters act and react. They can discover the sequences of events and the rhythm of stories. Many stories are written in rhyme which supports children to identify sounds; they can listen out for the word that sounds the same.  As stories are read to children it gives them the opportunity to respond to them and explore their own thoughts and feelings. Interacting and chatting also helps to develop the social act of conversation, learning when to talk and when to listen.

How to bring it back

Try to have a space which can be quiet and away from nursey traffic as much as possible. Soft furnishings, drapes, cushions etc can help to add to the cosy atmosphere. Have a variety of books; fiction, factual, books of rhymes and include books promoting equalities.  This area can be for quiet conversations as well as looking at books.

Ensure books are displayed attractively to invite children to come and look at them and remove any which are torn or have pages missing. Books should be available in all areas of the nursery and outside, not just in the story area.

Sharing with home

Share with families which story or a rhyme of the week you are focussing on. Recommend favourite authors suitable for their children.   Encourage adults to read to their children at home. If you have a library nearby advertise opening times to families suggest they make a visit.  Could you develop an ELC homelink library?

This is one of a weekly series of posts highlighting different spaces, experiences and interactions that practitioners have told us are not all easy to get back after the pandemic restrictions.

It’s all about playing, talking, and having fun together – so we hope they are useful.  If there are any ideas you’d like us to highlight, just get in touch with your link EYESO.

For ideas about family engagement, you will find a “home” version of this post on bumps2bairns.com

Leugh le Linda – Seachdain na Gàidhlig

The Highland Council Gaelic team are organising Leugh le Linda sessions to celebrate and support Seachdain na Gàidhlig (World Gaelic Week) the following sessions are available on Thursday 23rd February 2023. Please find information from Comhairle nan Leabhraichean, who are the lead support for organising the event. 

Thig còmhla ri Linda NicLeòid airson ‘Leugh is Seinn le Linda’; seiseanan-leughaidh Gàidhlig le stòiridh, òrain is geamannan. Thèid na seiseanan a lìbhrigeadh air-loidhne tro Microsoft Teams.

1 seisean aig 10:00 airson Sgoil-àraich

1 seisean aig 10:40 airson Sgoil-àraich

1 seisean aig 11:20 airson Clas1-3 

Fiosrachadh airson a’ Chlas/Sgoil-àraich agaibh a’ chlàradh airson an tachartas beò:

  • Cuiridh Linda coinneamhan Microsoft Teams air doigh airson nan seiseanan agus cuiridh i ‘invite’ dha na tidsearan
  • Air an latha, nì Linda na seiseanan air Microsoft Teams. Cha leig na tidsearan a leas ach bruthadh air an link a gheibh iad air post-d
  • For more information and to register schools should email Linda Macleod on lindanicleoid@gmail.com

Recovering Play – Getting to Know You!

Getting to Know You!

Meeting People in the Community

What is it?

There are so many wonderful opportunities to learn about the world right on our doorstep; in the local community. Children are naturally curious and often want to know what different people do; the postie, the bus driver or what different resources are used for; the bin lorry, a digger or delivery lorry.  These could be people they see often or people they don’t know exist until you introduce them. What is in your area?

Why is it important?

Meeting different people introduces children to a variety of skills used in real life situations and provides opportunities to experience many if not all areas of the curriculum

How to bring it back

Meeting people can happen in various ways, if possible, with Risk Assessment etc. in place, actually getting out into the community even on foot is a great opportunity to explore and discover. You will know your community and what is available and how connections can be made. In some settings it can be difficult to get out and about, but could you bring people in to chat to the children who are interested and maybe show the children what they do? People working in the community, grandparents, parents etc. even starting with people already working in the school /nursery; cook, janitor, clerical, cleaner etc., just to start with….

Sharing with home

Talk to families about interests they have that they could share and ask them if they know of anyone who the children would benefit from having the opportunity to interact with. Encourage families to look around their local area with their children and see what they can find.

This is one of a weekly series of posts highlighting different spaces, experiences and interactions that practitioners have told us are not all easy to get back after the pandemic restrictions.

It’s all about playing, talking, and having fun together – so we hope they are useful.  If there are any ideas you’d like us to highlight, just get in touch with your link EYESO.

For ideas about family engagement, you will find a “home” version of this post on bumps2bairns.com

New practice note for those providing ELC for 1 and 2 year olds.

Care Inspectorate have produced a new practice note for those providing ELC for children aged 1 and 2 years called ‘Growing my potential: Promoting safe, responsive, nurturing care and learning experiences and environments for babies and young children aged 1 and 2 years’.

This practice note has been designed to provide support and guidance to early learning and childcare (ELC) settings, including childminders. It shows the essential relationship between high-quality care and young children’s learning. It encourages staff to strengthen their self-evaluation approaches and supports continuous improvement to maximise the positive outcomes for our youngest children in Scotland.

You can access this practice note on Care Inspectorate Hub.