Recovering Play – Singing

Singing

What it is?

Most children love to dance, sing and make music.  Sometimes not as tunefully as adults might like!!

Why it is important?

It gives children the opportunity to be creative and express themselves. It helps with language development as they learn rhythm, begin to identify rhyming words and it develops listening skills. Singing helps to build confidence too when children like to perform for others. Gross and fine motor skills opportunities occur as children move around while singing or joining in with actions.

How to bring it back?

Ensure lots of opportunities are provided to encourage children to sing, either informally during the day or in an organised way. Support children when they spontaneously sing. Provide musical instruments perhaps near your role play area and also outdoors. Offer children chances to make their own type of musical instruments to accompany their singing, from junk modelling resources.

Sharing with home

Share with families the opportunities you are giving the children to join in with singing and music and tell them the songs and rhymes you are using and encourage them to continue these at home.

This is one of a weekly series of posts highlighting different spaces, experiences and interactions that practitioners have told us are not all easy to get back after the pandemic restrictions.

It’s all about playing, talking, and having fun together – so we hope they are useful.  If there are any ideas you’d like us to highlight, just get in touch with your link EYESO.

For ideas about family engagement, you will find a “home” version of this post on bumps2bairns.com

Recovering Play – Being me or being someone else?

Being me or being someone else?

Dressing Up and Role Play

What is it?

Many young children have a fascination for other people’s shoes, hats etc. and enjoy trying them on. While doing this, children often take on the persona they think they have become.  This lets them express themselves in a different way. It can be simply putting on a hat, scarf, shawl or even a piece of fabric to wrap themself in. it doesn’t need to be princess dresses, or superhero outfits. They will often use any resources they can find to support their play in a creative way.

Why is it important?

Role play allows children to be creative, use their imagination, experiment, investigate and explore. All these help to develop language and social skills, while also letting children collaborate with their friends and most of all have fun.

How to bring it back

Review what you are providing in your setting at the moment to promote this. Is it an inviting area with lots of open ended and real resources which draws the children in and allows them to be creative? If not, find real resources, kitchen utensils, junk materials, boxes, shirts, scarves, hats and add them to your area. think about how you present these so children can see what is available and readily access them independently.

Sharing with home

Remind families about the fun children have through dressing up and role play and how they can do this at home without buying ‘dress up costumes’

This is one of a weekly series of posts highlighting different spaces, experiences and interactions that practitioners have told us are not all easy to get back after the pandemic restrictions.

It’s all about playing, talking, and having fun together – so we hope they are useful.  If there are any ideas you’d like us to highlight, just get in touch with your link EYESO.

For ideas about family engagement, you will find a “home” version of this post on bumps2bairns.com

‘Oh no! 2 year olds in our setting!’

A little reminder to everyone intending to attend the online sessions please sign up through Highland CPD.

At the moment we have very little uptake so the course might not run. Please can you all take a few minutes and apply.

If you do apply, the course will be added to your CPD record for this year.

Course dates: 22.11.22 and 30.11.22

Recovering Play – Sensory Sensations!

Sensory Sensations!

Sand, water and messy play.

What is it?

Opportunities to explore the world using their senses is the way children begin to learn. Touch. Taste. Smell. Sight. Hearing. There are endless opportunities for these in nursery. Sand, water and playdough are amongst those used most often but there are many others; including foam, pasta, cereal, painting using fingers and hands, gloop and slime.  By adding colour and or scent to some of these you can increase the sensory opportunities available.

Why is it important?

Some young children find it soothing and comforting as they use their hands to touch and feel, many find this through a soft toy or a cuddly blanket. Various textures provide different responses from children. Some children will simply stand and allow water or sand to just run through or over their hands and find it soothing.

It can also aid fine motor skills as they manipulate the resources themselves and the tools to go with them. These opportunities provide many language opportunities as they can describe what it feels like and talk about what they are doing. Many of these opportunities can also be taken outside and others such as mud, grass etc. are found outdoors.

How to bring it back

At least one sensory experience and ideally more should be available daily. Ensure you have reasonable amounts of these resources to allow lots of exploration and creativity. present it in a way that children will want to come and engage. Keep in place all relevant cleaning processes and be aware of any allergies.

Sharing with home

Explain to families the benefits of sensory play opportunities and share how to make some of the resources you use in the setting and how they could use them at home, both indoors and outside.

This is one of a weekly series of posts highlighting different spaces, experiences and interactions that practitioners have told us are not all easy to get back after the pandemic restrictions.

It’s all about playing, talking, and having fun together – so we hope they are useful.  If there are any ideas you’d like us to highlight, just get in touch with your link EYESO.

For ideas about family engagement, you will find a “home” version of this post on bumps2bairns.com